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The First Brocketts in America

John Brockett arrives in 1637

1641 New Haven Map
The Nine Squares of New Haven, Connecticut
John Brockett's land is marked with a blue bar
Produced in 1641 Courtesy Yale University Library

Note: The following is paraphrased from Edward J Brockett's book "The Descendants of John Brockett". You may download it for free or read it online at http://www.archive.org/details/descendantsofjoh00inbroc.

John Brockett, the first person of the name of Brockett, came to America in 1637 in the ship Hector, with Rev. John Davenport and Theophilus Eaton. The ship arrived in Boston June 26, 1637. In regard to the persons who accompanied Rev. John Davenport to this country and who joined him in the settlement of New Haven, G. H. Hollister, in his "History of Connecticut," says, "They were gentlemen of wealth and character, with their servants and household effects. They were, for the most part, from London and had been bred to mercantile and commercial pursuits. Their coming was hailed at Boston with much joy, for they were the most opulent of all the companies who had emigrated to New England."
Shortly after the arrival of the Hector in Boston, Eaton and a few others, unwilling to join the Massachusetts Colony, explored the coast along Long Island Sound, selecting a tract of land near the Quinnipiac River, the present site of the City of New Haven, on which they left seven of their number to hold it for the winter.
In the spring of 1638 (April 13,) Davenport with others among whom was John Brockett followed. They purchased the lands at Quinnipiac of the Indians, and, "taking the Bible for their guide," formed an independent government or "Plantation Covenant" upon strictly religious principles. Prosperity attended them and they laid the foundations of a town and called it New Haven.
John Brockett seems to have been one of the leading men of the company, as his name more often appears in the records of the New Haven colony than of any man in civil life, except that of Theophilus Eaton.
He was a man of good judgment and one in whom the people had confidence, as shown from the fact, that in cases of trouble, or difference of opinion, he was generally appointed by the Planters on a committee to adjust matters.
When the Indians made claims obnoxious to the Settlers, he was appointed "one of a committee of four to investigate and advise with the Indians."
In 1660 when differences arose between the Conn. Colony at Hartford, and the New Haven Colony, as to boundary lines John Brockett was appointed one of the Commission to settle the troubles.
He had a widely extended reputation as a Civil Engineer and Surveyor, and in June, 1639, laid out the large square, (which is now the center of the City of New Haven, including the Common and the site of the College buildings) in nine equal sections. Mention is made in the Colonial Records of the perfection of this work, especially of the angles. The same boundaries still continue to be used.
Note: In 2010 the original central square is bordered by Chapel, College, Elm and Church streets. Temple street now bisects the central square. The present shoreline is much further away from the 9 squares also due to land reclamation over the ensuing three and a half centuries.
A few years later the Governor of New Jersey deputed John Brockett "to lay out, survey, and bound the said bounds of Elizabeth Town, (now the City of Elizabeth,) the planting fields, town lots, and to lay out every particular man's proposition, according to his allotments and the directions of the Governor, for the avoiding of all controversies and disputes concerning the same, having had certain notice of the good experience, knowledge, skill and faithfulness of John Brockett in the surveying and laying out of land."
This work was performed by John Brockett, and an allotment of land was made to him in the town of Elizabeth, which he held until 1670, when the record of its sale to Samuel Hopkins appears. In order to perform this work, John Brockett removed temporarily to Elizabethtown in Dec. 1667, residing there until 1670. The First General Assembly of New Jersey convened in Elizabeth town and was constituted May 26, 1668. The town had chosen John Ogden, Senior, and John Brockett to represent them in the House of Burgesses.

Nine Squares New Haven
The nine squares of New Haven, Connecticut inside the palisades.
Note East and West Rock jutting above the horizon. - Circa 1700. Courtesy Yale University Library

1st Generation - John and Mary (Blackwell) Brockett's Children

2nd Generation - John and Elizabeth (Dolittle) Brockett and Children

Note: The following is paraphrased from Edward J Brockett's book "The Descendants of John Brockett".
You may download it for free or read it online at http://www.archive.org/details/descendantsofjoh00inbroc.

John Brockett, the eldest son of John 1st, was born in New Haven in 1642, baptized Jan. 31, 1643.
In Davis' History of Wallingford it is stated that he was born in England. His tombstone in the Montowese Cemetery states his death in 1720, aged 78 years, which would make his birth in 1642, when, from the official records, we find that his father was in New Haven, and the record of his baptism in New Haven, it would seem, that, in this respect, Davis' record was inaccurate.
He was, however, educated in England and at Oxford, for a physician. He commenced practice in New Haven, but located at Muddy River, near North Haven, between New Haven and Wallingford, remaining there during his lifetime.
He had a large and valuable medical library which at his death he gave to Yale College, for the use of the physicians in New Haven ; this became scattered so that no trace of it can now (1904) be found.
He was a man of remarkable attainments for those days and the first permanently resident physician in New Haven Colony. He married Elizabeth Doolittle, daughter of Abraham Doolittle, who, with John Brockett 1st, was elected by the residents of Wallingford to manage all the affairs of the town. Elizabeth was born April 12, 1652, died March, 1731, and was buried beside her husband in the Montowese Cemetery.
In addition to his practice, Dr. John Brockett was a large land holder and carried on farming.
He received from his father's estate, large quantities of land, and in the 3rd general division of land in 1680, which was determined by the number of persons in his family and the amount of estate on which he paid taxes, Dr. John received 24 acres, naming 4 persons, and 40, while his mother, Widow Brockett, received 20 acres, having 4 persons and 19.
In the first allotment of lands in Wallingford he received 8 acres and in the allotment of 1689 he received an additional 44 acres. In 1 70 1 he was taxed in Wallingford on 87.
He died Nov., 1720; all his property went to his widow Elizabeth.

3rd Generation - Moses and Lydia Ann (Granis) Brockett and Children

Note: The following is paraphrased from Edward J Brockett's book "The Descendants of John Brockett".
You may download it for free or read it online at http://www.archive.org/details/descendantsofjoh00inbroc.

Moses Brockett 3 (John, 2 John 1 ), son of John and Elizabeth (Doolittle) Brockett, was born in Wallingford, April 23, 1680.
He married Lydia Ann Granis, Jan. 8, 1706, and was among the earliest settlers at Muddy River, a tributary of the Quinnipiac river in what is known as Wallingford today.
He was an active member of the First Ecclesiastical Society. Pres. Ezra Stiles records his name in his manuscript notes. He was a wealthy farmer and owned a great deal of real estate, one single piece of his land being one mile in width and two miles in length. Although he had many sons, he gave each one a farm when he married.
In his will he gave the two-mile lot, with house and barn, to his oldest living son, John ; the meadow and 6 acres to his son, Abel ; to Richard the homestead farm ; to Stephen the homestead ; and to his grandson, Ichabod, 4 acres.
His wife died April 6, 1742; he died Nov. 5, 1764.

4th Generation - Abel and Hannah (Pierpont) Brockett and Children

Note: The following is paraphrased from Edward J Brockett's book "The Descendants of John Brockett".
You may download it for free or read it online at http://www.archive.org/details/descendantsofjoh00inbroc.

Abel Brockett, 4 (Moses, s John, 2 John 1 ), son of Moses and Lydia Ann (Granis) Brockett, was born Aug. 11, 1725. July 24, 1755 married Hannah Pierpont, daughter of Joseph Pierpont and Hannah Russell, who was born Nov. 12, 1736, and died April 16, 1816.
According to The History of The Republican Party in Ohio, volume 2 "Abel was a stalwart Colonial patriot, and participated in the French and Indian War, as well as in the great Revolutionary struggle."
In 1760 Abel and his wife, Hannah, were members of the Congregational Church at New Haven. In 1765 an agreement was entered on the New Haven Records between Abel, his brother John and his sisters, Mary (wife of J. Jacobs), Elizabeth Robinson, and Abigail Barnes. In 1802 he deeded lands to his son, Lyman. Abel died August 4, 181 5.

5th Generation - Hezekiah and Mehitable (Candee) Brockett and Children

Note: The following is paraphrased from Edward J Brockett's book "The Descendants of John Brockett".
You may download it for free or read it online at http://www.archive.org/details/descendantsofjoh00inbroc.

Hezekiah Brockett, 5 (Abel, 4 Moses 3 John, 2 John, 1 ), son of Abel and Hannah (Pierpont) Brockett, born in North Haven, Conn., July 17, 1769; d. Sept. 22, 1850.
He married Mehitable Candee about 1791, and resided in Hamden. In the muster roll of the 2d Regiment, 7th Company, Capt. Ambrose Tuttle, in the War of 1812, the name of this Hezekiah, of Mount Carmel, appears.
"He was also a sea captain engaged in West India trade. On one occasion when he did not accompany his vessel on its voyage, he had a dream that the vessel had gone down. The impression he received was so vivid that he awoke his wife and told her his dream. As a fact, the vessel was never heard from, and he always believed that it went down that night. He never went to sea again. Mr. Brockett afterward engaged in the cooperage business at Mount Carmel, which was one of the leading industries of the country, and an important factor in the trade between New Haven and the West Indies."

6th Generation - Justus T and Miss (Robinson) Brockett and Children

Note: The following is paraphrased from Edward J Brockett's book "The Descendants of John Brockett".
You may download it for free or read it online at http://www.archive.org/details/descendantsofjoh00inbroc.

Justus T. Brockett 6 (Hezekiah, 5 Abel 4 Moses 3 John 2 John 1 ), son of Hezekiah and Mehitable (Candee) Brockett, was born about the year 1793. He married Miss Robinson, had two sons and removed to Oxford, Chenango County, N. Y., in 1817.

7th Generation - Justus T and Mary Ann (Robinson) Brockett and Children

Note: The following is paraphrased from Edward J Brockett's book "The Descendants of John Brockett".
You may download it for free or read it online at http://www.archive.org/details/descendantsofjoh00inbroc.

JJustus T. Brockett 7 (Justus T.,6 Hezekiah,5 Abel, 4 Moses,3 John,2 John 1 ), son of Justus T. 6 , was born in 1815 ; died May 27, 1896. He married Mary Ann Robinson.

8th Generation - Edgar and Catherine Louis (Beach) Brockett and Children

Edgar Brockett Grave
Edgar Brockett's grave marker
The Green Cemetery in
East Haven, Connecticut

Note: The following information is courtesy of Meg Milatz, a relative via Robert Brockett SR, who is currently researching our family tree.

Edgar Brockett 8, (Justus T., 7 Justus T.,6 Hezekiah,5 Abel, 4 Moses,3 John,2 John 1 ), son of Justus T. 7 , was born in 1843 ; died May 27, 1896. He married Catherine Louis Beach. Her nickname was Kate. Edgar fought in the Civil War in Company F and worked as a hostler, a person who works in a stable taking care of horses, in 1880. Catherine was born around 1850 and died around 1930.

9th Generation - Louis Jerome and Hattie A (Doane) Brockett and Children

Louis Brockett Grave
Louis Brockett's grave marker
The Green Cemetery in
East Haven, Connecticut

Note: The following information is courtesy of 1920 and 1930 US Census and Meg Milatz, a relative via Robert Brockett SR, who is currently researching our family tree. Memories from Mother, Jessie Brockett, are also included.

Louis J 9, (Edgar Brockett 8, Justus T., 7 Justus T.,6 Hezekiah,5 Abel, 4 Moses,3 John,2 John 1 ), son of Justus T. 7 , was born on March 6, 1879. He married Hattie A Doane and died on July 17, 1925. Hattie was born around 1880.

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